Monday, May 21, 2012

60 Steps Revisited: Step 3 - Know What Is Effective

Back in 2009, I did a series of posts covering the excellent book Crime Analysis For Problem Solvers. The book is published by the US DOJ's Problem Oriented Policing Center (POP Center). Because of the value I think this book has for crime analysts, and policing in general, I am going to re-post this series on here on the blog. 

There's a biblical quote that says "There is nothing new under the sun." This also applies to police work. Many times, the solutions to our local problems have been figured out by someone, somewhere else who has previously dealt with the same or a similar problem. The third step in Crime Analysis For Problem Solvers is to Know What Is Effective (and not) in Policing. If someone else, somewhere else found a solution to a similar problem, why not apply that knowledge in dealing with your problem? Conversely, if someone else tried and failed in their attempt to address a problem, why would you want to go down that same road to failure?
The lessons during a third of a century of research are now clear. Effective police work requires both focused attention and diverse approaches. The least effective policing uses neither element. The explanation for this is also clear. If diverse approaches are used without focus, it is difficult to apply the appropriate approach to the places and people who most require it. If police are focused on hot spots, but only enforce the law, they limit their effectiveness. A fully effective police agency must take advantage of the details of crime situations to reduce crime opportunities. Source: Crime Analysis For Problem Solvers
The authors include a very nifty chart explaining the general effectiveness of various policing approaches in the book. Click through the link to view it. Studies of some of the traditional approaches to crime control, show these methods aren't terribly effective. If this is the case then why do we still do them?
Crime analysts have important roles in applying both elements -
focusing with precision using their analytical methods, and helping to craft appropriate police tactics that fit the details of problems they have uncovered. Source: Crime Analysis For Problem Solvers
Do you know what practices work?

No comments:

Post a Comment

I reserve the right to remove defamatory, libelous, inappropriate or otherwise stupid comments. If you are a spammer or are link baiting in the comments, a pox be upon you. The same goes for people trying to sell stuff. Your comment will be deleted without mercy.